I've always held a fascination with the man born into the full industrial fury that Stoke-On-Trent was was, to carve himself an illustrious career in the Royal Navy, and then to become a household name for the most famous maritime disaster of all time. For many years I lived only around the corner from Well Street in Hanley, the place of his birth and youth, and openly opinionated that the pub at the bottom of the street, The Rising Sun be changed in name to something that championed this local hero... 

         Some years later, a work colleague commented in passing that he recalled the day, as a youth, he saw the statue of the Captain along London Road in Stoke neglected and partially obscured by undergrowth. I knew (how, I don't recall) there was a statue of him in Lichfield, and it sparked in me a curiosity to find the truth as to why there was no public memorial to the local man of the sea here in his home city. Along the way I found stories in Stoke-On-Trent City Council shame and public humiliation, the bringing of disgrace to the citizens of this conurbation; the blame and shame of sinking the finest ship of the times to the depths of the Atlantic.